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April 10, 2011
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Stenciling Tutorial by alphonia Stenciling Tutorial by alphonia
Note: (credited to benihimecosplay) Using sharpie to draw in the shapes will cause it to bleed onto the fabric.

I forgot to mention, but do follow the instructions of your paint and set it properly. It usually means ironing over it after it dries. And if you do screw up, you can dab at the paint with your wet towel before it dries and hopes that it'll be taken off.

This tutorial is pretty straightforward, but the most important thing here was the usage of materials. Most people use contact paper or oaktag/cardboard. But I find that these materials either curl up or has the tendency to move around. Freezer paper sticks and not leave any residue.

The brushes you use is also important. Sponge/foam brushes makes the paint even, while paint brushes tends to make it streaky. Spouncers are usually the best because of its round shape. They might be a bit expensive but keep washing them out before the paint dries and reusing them until they die.

For an idea about how to do a more intricate design, or just how the process goes, I recommend watching a time-lapse I done a long time ago. Go to this link: [link]

Don't follow the materials I mentioned there anymore. Screenprinting ink has a tendency to crack too, fabric paint like Tulips (not the 3D ones) are the best to use.
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:iconyuffeh:
This is an amazing tutorial! I just wanted to ask, would a roller brush or squeegee be better than a normal brush or a spouncer?
Reply
:iconalphonia:
A spouncer is the best, since it allows the most control over application
Reply
:iconpeacherine:
Peacherine Jan 25, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Might that be a Hakuouki coat at the bottom? It looks wonderful! This process seems really easy too. I'll definitely have to try it!

I had some success doing very simple one-color sakura designs on one of my cosplay outfits by using fabric ironed to Heat n' Bond... The edges are perfectly crisp, it was easy to work with... but it's not paint at all lol~

Thanks for sharing!
Reply
:iconalphonia:
Yup that is indeed a Hakuouki coat. It works way better than trying to freehand the flowers. Somewhere else on the same coat I've actually used the Heat and Bond method to add a design to it but I prefer how paints look more. Good luck on your project! :)
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:iconbenihimecosplay:
benihimecosplay Apr 29, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
hey I just wanted to add something, that if you use a sharpie to draw on the shape, that sharpie will come off on the fabric :| found that out the hard way
Reply
:iconalphonia:
I'll put that into the description in case anyone decides to use sharpie too. Pencil is usually the way I go in case I mess up tracing.
Reply
:iconmysticaquawolf1:
Mysticaquawolf1 Apr 17, 2011  Student Artisan Crafter
I wish I saw this before I made my bleach captain haori a few days ago, it would have been so much easier and neater. o.e;
Reply
:iconkisshu-neko:
Kisshu-Neko Apr 12, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Thanks for this tutorial! I'll be trying it for one of my next costumes :D

I just wondered if we can use the stencil a second time after its first usage?
Reply
:iconalphonia:
Yes you can, the stencils in the second picture are actually being reused for the second time. I'm pretty sure you can use it up to a few times before the wax doesn't stick anymore.
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:iconkisshu-neko:
Kisshu-Neko Apr 12, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Okay, thank you ^^. I will defenitly try it then! :)
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